Can I Afford to Buy a Homestead Cow?

Can I afford to buy a cow?  A look at the expenses and savings of purchasing your first cow.  | Homestead Honey

Can I afford to buy a cow? You know my answer to that question, as we just recently welcomed Creme Brulee to our homestead.  But since I like getting real about money on the homestead, I think it’s important to publicly talk about the financial side of this really big investment.  And yes, a cow is a huge investment – in money, in infrastructure, in time and effort. But it’s also a huge investment in your homestead, your pasture, your community, and your family’s well-being.

Brian and I looked seriously at our finances before purchasing a cow, as we would with any major purchase.  We are able to get delicious raw cow’s milk from a family farm, as well as Amish-made butter and cheese.  Did it make sense to buy a cow ourselves?  Would our investment pay off?

So we did the math.

First, let’s look at the expenses:

The cost of a homestead cow:

I found out quickly that the cost of a homestead cow varies significantly!  Not only regionally, but also depending on factors such as age, size and genetics. We purchased a 20 month bred heifer for $1,400. We also paid $300 in shipping costs and $100 in tests that I requested, as well as a health certificate to ship across state lines. So a total of $1800 for a bred animal (which is basically two animals). 

The costs of keeping a cow:

This involved a bit of guesswork, as we are brand new to keeping a cow, but I am making estimates based on local costs and the fact that we have ample pasture for 1-2 cows for at least 5-6 months of the year. I’m estimating $1,200/year for hay, minerals, supplemental feed, kelp, and vet bills. (But of course I’m prepared for this amount to change.)

I am opting NOT to include the costs of building a barn or purchasing electric fencing, as we’d use that equipment for any animal we’d purchase in the future.  However, it is a significant start-up cost.  Also, we already own many milking supplies such as buckets, funnels, filters, and cheese-making supplies.  Someone new to dairying would also want to consider these costs.

Creme Brulee, our new homested cow, grazing in her pasture.  Is purchasing a homestead cow a sound investment?  Read more to see what I think!  | Homestead Honey

And now, what we’d save or earn keeping a homestead cow:

What we currently spend on dairy:

I estimate that we spend $100 per month on dairy products – raw milk, butter, cheese, yogurt, cream, and the occasional pint of ice cream – for a total of approximately $1,200 per year. When we are able to provide our own dairy for most of the year, we’ll be saving at least $1,000.

The Calf:

When Creme Brulee calves this summer, I’m happy to have a heifer to raise as a milk cow, or to sell.  If she delivers a male calf, we’d turn him into a steer for meat.  Either way, we’d be saving money or making money.

Selling milk, cheese, and butter:

We live in an area that is populated with Amish farmers, so the raw milk market is a bit saturated and under-priced.  The Amish charge as low as $3 per gallon of cow’s milk.  We currently purchase raw milk from a Mennonite family that is committed to non-GMO and organic feeds, so we pay $7.50 per gallon. I believe we will sell occasional gallons of milk, as well as cheese and butter to local friends.  I’m conservatively estimating $500-$1,000 per year. 


The Bottom Line:

Yes, there is a significant money input in purchasing a homestead cow, but I believe that in about two years we’ll have paid back our investments, and will be able to pay for yearly upkeep/feed through our sales of animals and dairy products. 

And of course, there are the less quantifiable benefits of using a grazing animal to improve our pasture with their manure and urine, the bountiful manure for my garden, the companionship of a sweet animal, and finally, the health benefits of raising our own raw dairy products. PRICELESS!

 

I’d love to hear your thoughts.  Have you found that purchasing a homestead cow was a sound investment?

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Welcoming our Homestead Cow

Welcoming our new Homestead Cow | Homestead Honey

It’s hard to express the excitement we feel at finally welcoming our new Homestead Cow, Creme Brulée.  Having a dairy animal once again feels so right, so perfect for our little homestead, and yet it’s been a long path to find the right cow, to create infrastructure for a cow, and to invest in a cow.  And the learning adventure has just begun!

For Christmas last year, I presented Brian with a homemade Gift Certificate for “One Dairy Animal of Your Choice.”  For years we cared for Alpine dairy goats on our Oregon homestead, but when we moved to Missouri, we felt that a family milk cow would be a better choice.  For one, our landscape is well-suited for a grazing animal. And the fencing requirements for rambunctious goats were more than we could take on at this point.  Plus, who doesn’t love cream, butter, and ice cream?

A cow it was.

But which cow?  How does one go about finding and selecting a homestead cow?  I admit that I’m a total newbie when it comes to cow care, but I felt very sure about a few specific traits that I was seeking in a cow:

  • A gentle disposition, so our children could be involved in the love and care of our homestead cow
  • Raised on her dam’s milk for several months
  • Fed organic or non-GMO supplements, only as needed to maintain her condition

At first, my search led me to Misty Morning Farm, in Virginia. And I must credit Faith for sharing so freely and generously of her extensive cow knowledge as we tried to find a family milk cow that met my criteria, and her availability.  We were scheduled to receive one of their beautiful heifers in October, but unfortunately it did not work out in the end.

One of my favorite quotes from the musical The Sound of Music is, “The Reverend Mother always says, ‘when the Lord closes a door, somewhere he opens a window’.”

I mentioned on my Facebook Page that we were looking for a Jersey cow, and a window opened: a few hours from us, in Kansas, a reader named Lorinda is raising beautiful Jerseys to become Family Milk Cows.  We talked extensively before deciding that indeed, one of her bred heifers, Creme Brulée, would make a great addition to our homestead, and that we were the right family to care for her.

Creme Brulee, a Jersey milk cow, gets settled into her new home | Homestead Honey

Creme Brulée arrived on Saturday, and is settling into her new home, while we all begin the exciting task of getting to know one another.

How did we go about selecting a homestead cow?  Our top family cow requirements and Creme Brulee's arrival on our homestead | Homestead Honey

Cream, milk, and butter are in our near future, as she will calve in the late spring – early summer.  For now, we get to enjoy the simple pleasures of brushing and petting her, smelling the sweet smell of hay, and caring for the newest member of our homestead family.

Cow barn built with reclaimed materials, to house a Jersey milk cow | Homestead Honey

 

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Overcoming Homestead Setbacks

Overcoming Homestead Setbacks | Homestead Honey

Blogging about real life on a homestead can be an interesting challenge.  On the one hand, I don’t want to use this blog as a platform for whining when things go wrong, as it’s my vision to inspire and uplift others on their homesteading path. But to not share the challenges of homesteading seems unfair and unrealistic as well.

The truth is, we all have homestead set backs.

A few months ago, I mentioned to a close group of homestead blogging friends that I was feeling particularly affected by a long list of personal challenges:  Our property is currently threatened by a high-voltage power line project.   A lower back injury has taken months to resolve and I’ve been left with some minor nerve damage.  The cow that we had been waiting for months to arrive ended up not being able to come live with us.

In other words, life happened.

Luckily, I’m a pretty upbeat person, and I tend to bounce back from challenges pretty quickly (although boy, do I feel them acutely in the moment!!!).  I’m at the core of a grassroots group fighting to protect our community. My back is (slowly) healing.  A reader contacted me about her sweet Jersey cow, and Creme Brulee will be coming to live with us in a few days.

Life is moving forward.

My general strategy when faced with challenging personal or homestead situations is to fight despair with action. After a good cry, or a healthy mourning period, I tend to get practical. What can I do to make my situation better?  How can I turn a lemon into lemonade?  Not to say that real life challenges are always easy to turn around.  Certainly, I have yet to find a real silver lining to a debilitating back injury, but perhaps some day I will!

As our homesteading group discussed these challenges, we got to talking about homestead set backs in general. How do we cope with them?  What characteristics make a good homesteader?  What traits has homesteading given us?  

I found our discussion really inspirational and full of wisdom that I hope will help anyone on their homestead journey.

“I know that stubborn determination has kept me going in many many things. I am hoping this same stubbornness that I see in my own children is going to benefit them in the long run!!”- Leona of My Healthy Green Family

“When It comes to farm set backs, to me it’s easy. Get up. Dust your self off.  Move forward.”  – Katie of livinlovinfarmin

“The homestead life does change you and give you emotional coping skills that you maybe didn’t have before.”  – Chris of Joybilee Farm

“I’ve found that the homestead life cheers me up because I love it so much. We are closer to the life and death cycle living this life, which makes it both challenging and beautiful.” – Isis of Little Mountain Haven

“I do think there’s a certain grit homesteaders possess. Maybe they don’t possess it from the beginning, but they learn it real quick- it seems to be the only way to survive. I think you have no choice but to do the next thing after something goes wrong on the homestead, because all the “next things” have to get done anyway.

The overarching theme of my life- clearly the lesson I am supposed to be learning- is perseverance. So many things I don’t want to do or deal with, or conversely that I want to accomplish, seem to rely on perseverance. To either get through the things you don’t want to be dealing with or to accomplish something you want. Always perseverance. Maybe a hefty dose of stubbornness in there too.”  – Ashley of Whistle Pig Hollow

For more thoughts about overcoming homestead set backs, check out these posts:

Annie at Montana Homesteader wrote a great post about The Power of Positive Thinking on the Homestead.

And here’s a good reminder from Heather of Green Eggs and Goats about what do do when you feel like quitting homesteading!

 

What about you?  How do you overcome homestead set backs?  What qualities do you think homesteaders must have?

 

 

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An Advent Spiral Celebration

An Advent Spiral Celebration for our Waldorf homeschooling cooperative | Homestead Honey One of the sweetest yearly rituals that our family enjoys is an Advent spiral in the weeks leading up to Christmas.  Although we do not practice a particular religion at home, I find that the Advent spiral encompasses all of the many festivals of light in a beautiful, introspective, and peace-filled way.

Our Waldorf homeschool cooperative group has come together to celebrate this festival for the past three years.  The details have changed from year to year, but the essence remains the same: the spiral, songs, a story, and a shared meal.

The Spiral

The Advent spiral is really at the heart of our festival. It is not possible to describe how precious it is to watch each child walk slowly into the center of the spiral, carefully carrying his or her candle.  When they finally make their way to the very center, they “kiss” the candle of Peace, Love, Hope, or Joy, and then unwind the spiral to the next candle that needs lighting.  They walk with such care and peace and intention that the beauty of this ritual often brings me to tears.

An Advent Spiral Celebration | Homestead Honey

Songs

We have a few favorite songs that we sing each year, and the kids now know them by heart.  This year we sang verses of the Advent Song (Candle, Candle burning bright…) in between each child’s walk through the spiral, and it was quite beautiful.  This post has a complete list of all of our favorite December/Advent songs.

Story

In years past, we have read the book Holly and Ivy over the course of the four weeks of Advent.  This is  such a sweet and heartwarming book that is perfect for young children (our group ranges in age from 2.5 to 7 years old).  This year, we decided to take turns reading favorite holiday books aloud to begin our evening, as a quieting transition between arrival and the Advent spiral.

 

The evening typically ends with a shared meal, potluck style, and kid shenanigans!  The Advent spiral is something I look forward to each year as a grounding anchor to the otherwise overstimulating month of December.

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Welcome, December!

In the cold, dark month of December, I look forward to celebrations.  Our family will celebrate Ella’s 7th birthday, Advent with our Waldorf homeschooling group, Solstice, and Christmas, bringing love and light to each other and to our loved ones.  December is a month of such activity and creation, and I am excited to dive into some handmade gift making.

I’m also committed to spending my dollars carefully and thoughtfully with small businesses that I love and appreciate.  As a small business owner myself, I know that this month can be critical for keeping afloat. As a customer, I want to strike a balance between DIY and purchasing.  And I know many of you feel the same way.

I am honored to have incredible small businesses as sponsors on Homestead Honey.  Without the support of these businesses, I would not be able to continue blogging as I do.

If you’re looking for a special gift for a loved one (or for yourself!) I really hope you will visit their sites and send them your love!

Aspen Herbals – Brand new sponsor, Aspen Herbals makes artisan herbal body care, at ONE with nature. I’m so excited to try their Lotion Twig – Northern Gale is infused with Thyme, Yarrow and Peppermint!

Fermentools – Kits and supplies for fool-proof small batch fermentation.  I have the Starter Kit, and I’m using it to make an amazing Spicy Kraut. Couldn’t be easier!

Spicy kraut happening with the help of !  Recipe here: http://homestead-honey.com/2013/11/11/kraut-three-ways/

Backwoods Solar – Solar, wind, and hydro systems for your home.  Backwoods Solar helped us design a customized solar electric system for our home, and we really couldn’t not have done the install ourselves had it not been for their amazing tech support!

Woo hoo!  panels up!

Lavender’s Blue Homeschool - A resource for peaceful parenting and holistic homeschooling, now offering a complete First Grade Waldorf-inspired curriculum, as well as a kindergarten curriculum!  We have used both curriculum and love them.  Plus, when you purchase, there is an amazing private Facebook group for support!

The Aquaponic Source – Providing learning materials, products, and leadership to empower people to grow their own fish and vegetables in their homes and schools.  I love all of the resources that are available on their website and really encourage you to check it out if you are interested in learning more about Aquaponics!

Acorn Hill Handcrafts – My family’s own Etsy Shop!  This holiday we’re featuring some gorgeous black walnut cutting and serving boards made with wood from our own homestead. My blacksmith husband Brian also creates one-of-a-kind hand-forged metal pieces, including hooks, hanging rods, and coat racks.  (Use coupon code HOMESTEAD10 for 10% off!)

LEB5c

The Dental Essentials -A nutritional supplement that has been specially formulated to reduce cavities. (Use coupon code Homestead for 15% off!).  I’ve mentioned many times that we love and use our Dental Essentials supplements.  This is my favorite product – an easy to take liquid supplement for that we give our kids.

TEND Magazine – A quarterly, downloadable magazine, designed to nourish a mindful life. (Use coupon code HOMEHON10 for 10% off!).  Gorgeous photos, an emphasis on homemade food, crafts and a simple life. Get yourself an issue and read it by a fire, with a warm cup of cocoa for a perfect winter experience!

Ollie and Stella Children’s Outfitters – Featuring super high-quality DucKsday outdoorwear for kids.  We LOVE LOVE LOVE our DucKsday snowsuit and rain jacket.  They are the best kids outdoor wear I’ve purchased, and SO cute!

First snow day! Time to pull out the winter gear. I LOVE these snow suits from DucKsday USA.

Gypsy Forest - Natural goods for home and play.  I love this Silk Flag Banner Bunting. It would be a great addition to our birthday celebrations!  (Use coupon code WINTERGYPSY for 10% off!)

The Sitting Tree – Handmade goods, for a free-spirited life.  Liz’s Etsy Shop is gorgeous and I would love to get myself one of everything!  I especially am loving this doll (bear) sweater pattern – so cute!

Randi Jo Fabrications – Soft goods for bicyclers.   I can personally recommend almost all of Randi Jo’s products, since I use them and wear them!  But her Wool Flip-Up Caps are by far my favorite – toasty, cute, and never itchy.

RandiJo1

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Are you a small business owner? I am currently accepting new sponsors for Homestead Honey, with special Holiday Advertising opportunities available.  Please take a look at my Media Kit on my Sponsorship page, and contact me to get started!

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Discover Herbs with The Herbarium

Perhaps you’re new to the healing power of herbs, or perhaps, like me, you’ve dabbled in using herbs for health and well-being, but would love to have a one-stop place for information, resources, and connection.

Introducing The Herbarium.

The Herbarium from Herbal Academy of New England

The Herbarium is the new membership site of the Herbal Academy of New England (HANE).  In case you haven’t yet checked out HANE’s blog, it is a real treasure – full of recipes, articles and information.  So I was really excited when I got the opportunity to preview The Herbarium.

A friend of mine said that this website reminded her of the book, The Secret Garden, and I have to agree: The site is as beautiful as it is packed with information.

Do you want to learn more about a specific herb? Simply explore the Monographs and search by name or by properties such as ways to use, actions, taste, or energy.  Each herb is then described in thoughtful detail, and with gorgeous illustrations and photographs.

The Herbarium by Herbal Academy of New England

The Herbarium by The Herbal Academy of New England

What most intrigued me are the forums. I find that I hold back on using herbs as much as I would like to because I don’t feel fully confident about how to use them.  I love that a community of herb-lovers and herb-learners can come together on The Herbarium site and share their knowledge and questions.

The Herbarium will be growing each month with new content, videos, podcasts, media, and ebooks. It’s sort of like a magazine subscription –  an ongoing herbal educational resource.

Right now, the Herbal Academy of New England is offering a discount for a full year membership pass to the website for only $39 using the coupon code GIVETHANKS.  If you’re excited about adding to your herbal knowledge, I think you’ll really enjoy The Herbarium.

 

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Tiny House Tour :: Part One

Come along on a video tour of our 350 square foot Tiny House and learn how a family of four fits into such a small space! | Homestead Honey

One thing I love about blogging is receiving emails from people who are following their own radical homestead path.  Frequently, the questions I receive are related to building and living in a tiny house, particularly an off-grid tiny house.  Often I get asked for photos or a tour of our tiny house interior.

If you’ve been following along for a while, you know that my husband built our 350 square foot home. (If you’re new to Homestead Honey, please check out this category for posts that I’ve shared as we’ve built.)  With hardwood floors in place, bookshelves neatly dividing the living room from the bedroom, and windows freshly washed, it seemed like the perfect time to take you on a video tour of our tiny home.

Today, I’m sharing half of our tiny home – the living room and bedroom.  I really hope you enjoy the tour of our home, and please feel free to ask any questions in the comments! (And yes, next time I’ll turn the phone sideways – live and learn!)

 

This post was shared on the Homestead Barn Hop

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100+ Handmade Holiday Gift Ideas

Over 100 DIY Ideas for Handmade Holiday Gifts | Homestead Honey

Do you love handmade holiday gifts as much as I do?

For many years, Brian and I have created handmade gifts for our friends and family – candles, paper, truffles (yum!), cutting boards, liqueur, knitted scarves, hats, fingerless gloves, and many more.  Creating gifts with our own hands is something we value, something we pour our love into, and we hope that the recipients love the gifts as much as we love making them.

(Spoiler alert: If you’re related to me, you should probably stop reading now!)

So, what to make this year?  Some of my absolute favorite homestead bloggers and I have compiled a list of over 100 handmade holiday gifts to make at home:

For the Home

  • Beeswax candles are one of my favorite winter treats.  They give amazing light, smell great, and are easy and fun to make.  Here’s a step by step photo tutorial that I put together.
  • If you’re like me and have an incredible collection of Mason Jars, then you’ll love this collection of ten easy ways to turn a canning jar into a Christmas present, from Learning and Yearning!
  • Joybilee Farm has put together a collection of gift ideas just for MEN!  I know I always find it hard to make something for my husband, so I’m really looking forward to diving into some of her projects.

For the Body

For the Kitchen

For the Kids

  • I’m a huge fan of imaginative play and open-ended gifts.  Simple, natural materials make incredible gifts for kids, and these felt wool balls are no exception.
  • This simple yet stunning scarf from Meredith at ImaginAcres is adult-sized, but I bet it would make a fantastic gift for teens and children as well. I know my daughter Ella would love it!
  • If you have wee ones to make for, check out this awesome tutorial for DIY Upcycled Baby and Toddler Pants from Montana Solar Creations.

Shop Small

  • If you don’t have the time or inclination to make your own, why not support a small business!  Homestead Honey’s sponsors are some of the best small businesses I know. From silk play scarves, to cycling caps, to fermenting equipment, and much more.  Check them out in the Sidebar and let them know I sent you!
  • And finally, here’s a shameless plug for my family’s Etsy shop, Acorn Hill Handcrafts, where my husband Brian makes one of a kind serving and cutting boards and hand-forged items such as this gorgeous candleholder.

Handforged candleholder from Acorn Hill Handcrafts | Homestead Honey

Plus, if you use the code “Homestead10″ you’ll receive 10% off your order!

 

Dozens more inspiring handmade holiday gift ideas can be found here:

Have Yourself a Homemade Christmas at Learning and Yearning

A DIY Christmas at My Healthy Green Family

A Dozen DIY Christmas Gifts for Men at Joybilee Farm

100+ Handmade Holiday Gift Ideas at Ever Growing Farm

100+ Homemade Christmas Gifts at Montana Homesteader

The Ultimate Homemade Holiday at ImaginAcres

12 Days of Homemade Christmas Gifts at Livin Lovin Farmin

(Really) Last Minute Homemade Christmas Gifts at Homestead Honey

 

Happy Making!
Teri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist :: Book Review

Maybe you’ve heard about Permaculture, but you’re not really sure what it is. Or perhaps the words Edible Landscaping make you drool, but you don’t know how to start creating one.  The book Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd is a user-friendly, project packed introduction to these topics that will leave you inspired to create your own edible backyard!

Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist by Michael Judd | Reviewed on Homestead Honey  http://homestead-honey.com

Chapters focus on subjects including:

  • Herb Spiral, The Ultimate Raised Bed 
  • Fungi!! Growing Specialty Mushrooms
  • Hugelkultur, Mounds of Fertility
  • Earthen Ovens

My own family has been creating Permaculture systems here on our homestead. For instance, we’ve begun to experiment with building swales and mounds to retain and utilize water, and have planted the beginnings of a food forest.  In fact, before we even had a house to live in, we had already planted over 20 fruit tree cultivars and 100 native edible trees and shrubs.

However, I still feel like we’re years away from the type of lush, dense edible landscape that I envision.  Partly, this is a practical matter – trees take a long time to produce fruit!  But partly it’s because creating a food forest can feel overwhelming.

Young fruit tree planted in a food forest | Homestead Honey

That’s why I really appreciated the chapter Food Forest.  Judd walks the reader through the process of starting a food forest from scratch, step by step. I appreciated how he uses many visuals that illustrate his techniques – both graphics and photos.  He even walks us through the technique of creating “guilds,” or companion plantings for fruit trees, including a number of suggestions of which plants to select as companions.  This spring, I plan to start as many insectary and pollinator plants as possible from seed, and secure some comfrey roots from my neighbors!

I also loved Judd’s passion for Uncommon Fruits.  I am also a huge fan of many of the same fruits he describes – Persimmons, Mulberries, Hardy Kiwi.  We have planted dozens of mulberries, native plums, persimmons, and paw paws on our land, and hope that years from now they will be giving us delicious fruit.  Each uncommon fruit is described, and basic growing techniques covered.  I guarantee that this chapter will make you want to order some fruit trees!

Preparing persimmons for freezing | Homestead Honey

If you’re interested in learning more about Edible Landscaping or Permaculture, this book is a great introduction.

And I’m happy to share that I have TWO signed copies to giveaway on my blog!  Simply enter with the Rafflecopter widget below.

The fine print: the giveaway will begin on November 2 at 12am Central, and will end on November 4 at 12 am Central.  Because I’m paying shipping, I’d appreciate US entries only.  The winner will be notified by email and will have 24 hours to respond before I select a new winner.  Thank you!

Congratulations to our winners: Janette N. and Kim S. Please check your email!

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Welcome, November!

We welcomed November with our first hard frost!  When we awoke, the thermometer read 19 degrees, our cat’s water bowl was frozen solid, and we cooked indoors for the first time since June!  We spent most of Friday harvesting the last of our summer vegetables – green tomatoes, a few red cayenne peppers, eggplants, and one last delicious watermelon.  A few cold hardy crops remain growing in the garden – kale, carrots, parsley, turnips, and a few brassicas.

Fall is one of my favorite times to preserve food through lactic acid fermentation (think sauerkraut in all flavors and homemade hot sauce!), which is why I’m really excited to introduce you to a new Homestead Honey sponsor, Fermentools.

Fermentools - supplies for home scale fermentation | Homestead Honey

Fermentools offers kits and supplies for fool-proof small batch fermentation.  You provide mason jars and vegetables, and their Starter Kit provides the rest!  I’m really excited to experiment with this new tool, and will share my results this fall!  You can check out Fermentools’ full website here.


I appreciate my sponsors so very much, and invite you to visit all of these awesome small businesses!  

Backwoods Solar – Solar, wind, and hydro systems for your home.  Backwoods Solar helps customers design and select customized systems for their off-grid needs.

Lavender’s Blue Homeschool – A resource for peaceful parenting and holistic homeschooling, now offering a complete First Grade Waldorf-inspired curriculum, as well as a kindergarten curriculum!

The Aquaponic Source – Providing learning materials, products, and leadership to empower people to grow their own fish and vegetables in their homes and schools

The Dental Essentials -A nutritional supplement that has been specially formulated to reduce cavities. (Use coupon code Homestead for 15% off!)

TEND Magazine – A quarterly, downloadable magazine, designed to nourish a mindful life. (Use coupon code HOMEHON10 for 10% off!)

Ollie and Stella Children’s Outfitters – Featuring super high-quality DucKsday outdoorwear for kids

Gypsy Forest - Natural goods for home and play

The Sitting Tree – Handmade goods, for a free-spirited life

Randi Jo Fabrications – Soft goods for bicyclers

* * * * * * * *

Are you a small business owner? I am currently accepting new sponsors for Homestead Honey, with special Holiday Advertising opportunities available.  Please take a look at my Media Kit on my Sponsorship page, and contact me to get started!

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